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C9H14N2O

The molecular formula C9H14N2O may refer to:

ABT-418
3-Isobutyl-2-methoxypyrazine
Phenoxypropazine

This set index page lists chemical structure articles associated with the same molecular formula.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

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Julian C. Dixon

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Julian C. Dixon

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California’s 32nd district

In office
January 3, 1993 – December 8, 2000

Preceded by
Glenn M. Anderson

Succeeded by
Diane Watson

Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from California’s 28th district

In office
January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1993

Preceded by
Yvonne Brathwaite Burke

Succeeded by
Karen Bass

Member of the California State Assembly

In office
1972-1978

Personal details

Born
August 8, 1934
Washington, D.C.

Died
December 8, 2000(2000-12-08) (aged 66)
Los Angeles, California

Resting place
Inglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, California

Political party
Democratic

Spouse(s)
Bettye Lee

Children
Cary Gordon Dixon

Military service

Allegiance
 United States

Service/branch
 United States Army

Years of service
1957–1960

Rank
Sergeant

Battles/wars
Vietnam

Julian Carey Dixon (August 8, 1934 – December 8, 2000) was an American politician from the state of California serving from 1979 until his death from a heart attack in Washington, D.C. in 2000.

Contents

1 Biography
2 See also
3 References
4 External links

Biography[edit]
Dixon was born in Washington D.C. and served in the United States Army from 1957 to 1960. He graduated from California State University, Los Angeles in 1962. He was elected to the California State Assembly as a Democrat in 1972, and served in that body for three terms. Dixon was elected to the House of Representatives in 1978. He chaired the rules committee at the 1984 Democratic National Convention and the ethics probe into Speaker Jim Wright. Dixon won re-election to the 107th United States Congress, but died of a heart attack in December 2000.[1]
The busy 7th Street / Metro Center / Julian Dixon transfer station for the Red Line, Purple Line, Blue Line and Expo Line in downtown Los Angeles is named after Dixon, with a plaque commemorating his role in obtaining the federal funding that enabled construction of the Metro Rail system. His alma mater, Southwestern University School of Law, in 2004 opened the Julian C. Dixon Courtroom and Advocacy Center in the former Bullocks Wilshire building. The Culver City branch of the Los Ang
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Gösta Sjöberg

Gösta Sjöberg

Personal information

Born
6 March 1896
Ravlunda, Simrishamn, Sweden

Died
26 November 1968 (aged 72)
Farsta, Stockholm, Sweden

Sport

Sport
Diving

Club
Malmö SS

Gösta Gabriel Sjöberg (6 March 1896 – 26 November 1968) was a Swedish diver who competed in the 1912 Summer Olympics. He finished fourth in his heat of the 10 m platform event and did not advance to the final.[1][2]
References[edit]

^ Gösta Sjöberg. sports-reference.com
^ Gösta Sjöberg. Swedish Olympic Committee

This biographical article relating to Swedish sport is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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This biographical article related to diving is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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John Douglas Armour

John Douglas Armour

Puisne Justice of the Supreme Court of Canada

In office
November 21, 1902 – July 11, 1903

Nominated by
Wilfrid Laurier

Preceded by
Henri Elzéar Taschereau

Succeeded by
Albert Killam

Personal details

Born
(1830-05-04)May 4, 1830
Otonabee, Upper Canada

Died
July 11, 1903(1903-07-11) (aged 73)
London, England

John Douglas Armour (May 4, 1830 – July 11, 1903) was a Canadian Puisne judge of the Supreme Court of Canada.
Born in the township of Otonabee, Upper Canada (now Ontario), the son of Samuel Armour, he was educated at Upper Canada College, and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1850 from the University of Toronto. He then articled with his brother, Robert Armour, and then with P. M. M. VanKoughnet. He was called to the Bar in 1853 and practised law for 25 years in Cobourg, Ontario. In 1877, he was appointed to the Court of Queen’s Bench of Ontario and was appointed as its chief justice in November of that year. In 1901, he was appointed Chief Justice of Ontario. In 1902, he was appointed to the Supreme Court of Canada but only served seven months before his death. Armour died in London while there on work with the Boundary Commission.
Legacy[edit]
Mount Armour, aka Boundary Peak 175, a summit on the boundary between British Columbia and the US state of Alaska, was named for him. Justice Armour was one of the original commissioners of the Alaska Boundary Tribunal and was replaced on it after his death by A.B. Aylesworth.[1]
Also Armour Township in Ontario, Canada, was named after him.[2]
References[edit]

^ “Armour, Mount”. BC Geographical Names. 
^ “The Honourable Mr. Justice John Douglas Armour”. Township of Armour. Retrieved 2010-08-17. 

External links[edit]

Supreme Court of Canada biography
People of Upper and Lower Canada

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The Taschereau court (1902–06)

1902–03:

R. Sedgewick
D. Girouard
L. Davies
D. Mills
J. Armour

1903–05:

R. Sedgewick
D. Girouard
L. Davies
W. Nesbitt
A. Killam

1905–06:

R. Sedgewick
D. Girouard
L. Davies
J. Idington
J. Maclennan

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Carleton College Cowling Arboretum

This article does not cite any sources. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The Carleton College Cowling Arboretum (also referred to as the Arb) consists of approximately 880 acres (360 hectares) of land adjacent to Carleton College, in Northfield, Minnesota. It was created under President Donald J. Cowling and Professor Harvey E. Stork in the 1920s. Professor Stork and Superintendent of Grounds D. Blake Stewart (“Stewsie”) were responsible for much of the early development of the Arboretum, and their influences can still be seen and felt in many places. Stork and Stewsie were remarkable land managers, and it can be argued that they were among the nation’s first restoration ecologists. In particular, their planting of upland forest trees and wildflowers in the Upper Arboretum (Stork Forest) decades ago is now coming to impressive maturity.
The original Arboretum has been augmented both by absorbing the Carleton Farm as it was closed down in the 1960s, and by purchases of adjoining farmland. Cultivated land, which originally made up much of the property within the Arboretum, has slowly been phased out since 1970, and will probably be eliminated within the next few years.
The Arboretum is divided by Highway 19 into the Upper Arboretum (south of the highway) and the Lower Arboretum (north of the highway; “lower” because it contains the low-lying floodplain of the Cannon River). The two portions of the Arboretum differ in character and in the pattern of visitor use. Since the Upper Arboretum is closer to both the campus and most Northfield residents, it receives more traffic and is being developed for heavier use. The Upper Arboretum has greater trail density, some trails designated for bike use, and generally smaller areas of natural communities. In contrast, the Lower Arboretum has populations of rare plants and animals and has primary conservation and education importance. Therefore, the Lower Arboretum has fewer trails, no bike use, and large contiguous areas of natural habitat.

Contents

1 Purpose of the Arboretum

1.1 Education
1.2 Conservation
1.3 Recreation

2 Habitats

2.1 Upland Forest and Successional Upland Forest
2.2 Floodplain Forest and Successional Floodplain Forest
2.3 Prairie
2.4 Oak Savanna
2.5 Water and Wetlands
2.6 Conifer Plantation
2.7 Grass Monoculture

3 See also
4 Externa
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University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center

University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center

University of Maryland Medical System

Geography

Location
Glen Burnie, Maryland, United States

Services

Emergency department
Yes

Beds
319

History

Founded
1965

Links

Website
http://www.mybwmc.org/

Lists
Hospitals in Maryland

University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center (BWMC) is a hospital in Glen Burnie, Maryland that is part of the University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS). This hospital opened as North Arundel Hospital in 1965 with three floors and limited acute care services. In 2000, North Arundel Hospital joined into UMMS and in 2005, the name was changed to Baltimore Washington Medical Center to reflect the hospital’s growth in size and greater regionality from expanded services.
BWMC currently consists of:

the original hospital building containing general medicine and surgical services
Emergency Department
Diabetes Center
Tate Cancer Center
Aiello Breast Center
Maryland Vascular Center
Joint Replacement Center
Spine and Pain Center
Wound Healing Center

Awards and recognition[edit]
In 2006, Solucient, a firm that measures performance for healthcare centers, named BWMC one of America’s Top 100 Hospitals in the Large Community Hospital category. BWMC was the only hospital in Maryland and Washington, D.C. to earn the award.[1] 2011- Security Department ranked #56 of top 500 hospital security department in the country by Security Magazine.
References[edit]

^ Solucient’s 100 Top Hospitals

External links[edit]

Baltimore Washington Medical Center website
Baltimore Washington Medical Center on Google Street View

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Hospitals in Maryland

General/Acute/Emergency

Adventist HealthCare – Shady Grove
Adventist HealthCare – Washington
Anne Arundel Medical Center
Atlantic General
Bon Secours Hospital
Calvert Memorial
Carroll Hospital
Doctors Community
Fort Washington
Frederick Memorial
Garrett Regional
GBMC
Holy Cross – Germantown
Holy Cross – Silver Spring
Howard County General
Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins Bayview
Laurel Regional
McCready Memorial
MedStar Franklin Square
MedStar Good Samaritan
MedStar Harbor
MedStar Montgomery
MedStar Southern Maryland
MedStar St. Mary’s
MedStar Union Memorial
Mercy
Meritus
Northwest
Peninsula Regional Medical Center
Prince George’s
St. Agnes
Sinai
Suburban
Union
University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) (R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center)
UMMC Midtown
UM Baltimore Washington Medical Center
UM Charles

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Golden Warrior Gold Lightan

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Golden Warrior Gold Lightan

Screenshot showing Gold Lightan reaching his hand out to Hiro.

黄金戦士ゴールド・ライタン
(Ōgon Senshi Gōrudo Raitan)

Genre
Mecha

Anime television series

Directed by
Kōichi Mashimo

Studio
Tatsunoko Production

Original network
Tokyo 12 TV

Original run
1 March 1981 – 18 February 1982[1]

Episodes
52[1] (List of episodes)

Anime and Manga portal

Golden Warrior Gold Lightan (黄金戦士ゴールド・ライタン, Ōgon Senshi Gōrudo Raitan?) is a mecha anime television series that aired from 1981 to 1982 in Japan. The show was also popular in Hong Kong and was aired there around the same time. There are 52 episodes that were aired at 30 minutes each.[2]

Contents

1 Original story
2 Concept
3 Staff
4 Characters
5 Lightan Robots
6 Episode titles
7 Merchandise
8 References
9 External links

Original story[edit]
The story is about a young boy named Hiro Taikai who finds a gold lighter which turns out to be the giant Golden Warrior Gold Lightan with the mission to save the earth from an invasion by King Ibalda. Gold Lightan joined forces with his robot teammates to ruin the plots of King Ibalda and destroy invading alien robots by using his surpassing hand and leg strikes. Hiro also founded a group called the “Bratty Rangers” with his friends.[1]
Concept[edit]
The robot is usually disguised as a tiny gold Zippo-style lighter in Hiro’s pocket. When called upon, Gold Lightan transforms into a giant robot towering at 30 meters and weighing 200 tons. All robots in the show are sentient and do not require pilots. Usually the robot ends a battle with a trademark golden hand stab move which drives a hand strike cutting the enemy robots body, pulling out and smashing the heartbox energy device.[3]
Staff[edit]

Presenter: Kenji Yoshida[1]
Planners: Ippei Kuri, Shigeru Yanagawa
Producer: Tomoyuki Miyata
Chief Director: Koichi Mashimo
Character Design: Ippei Kuri
Mecha Establishment : Masaharu Kawamori
Music: Masayuki Jinbo, Masayuki Yamamoto
Animation director: Takashi Nakamura (Episode 6, 22, 30, 41, 48)
Key Animation: Takashi Nakamura (Episode 41)

Characters[edit]

Japanese name
Japanese full name
English name
Voices by

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Marc Van de Mieroop

This biographical article relies too much on references to primary sources. Please improve this biographical article by adding secondary or tertiary sources. Contentious material about living persons that is unsourced or poorly sourced must be removed immediately, especially if potentially libelous or harmful. (May 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Marc Van de Mieroop

Born
Marc Van de Mieroop
1958
Belgium

Education
Ph.D., Yale University, 1983
M.A., Yale University, 1980
B.A., Katholieke Universiteit, 1978

Occupation
Assyriologist

Marc Van de Mieroop (PhD Yale 1983) is a professor (full professor 1996) of Ancient Near Eastern history at Columbia University.
In addition to his articles and translations, his book publications include:

Crafts in the Early Isin Period (1987),
Sumerian Administrative Documents from the Reigns of Ishbi-Erra and Shu-Ilishu (1987)
Society and Enterprise in Old Babylonian Ur (1992)
The Ancient Mesopotamian City (1997 and 1999) Oxford University Press, Oxford. ISBN 978-0-19-815286-6
Cuneiform Texts and the Writing of History (1999)
King Hammurabi of Babylon (2005) Blackwell, Oxford. ISBN 978-1-4051-2660-1
The Eastern Mediterranean in the Age of Ramesses II (2007) Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford. ISBN 978-1-4051-6069-8
A History of Ancient Egypt (2011) Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford. ISBN 978-1-4051-6071-1
with Bonnie Smith, Richard von Glahn, and Kris Lane “Crossroads and Cultures. A History of the World’s Peoples” 2012, Bedford-St. Martin, ISBN 0-312-57317-0
A History of the Ancient Near East, ca. 3000-323 BC (2015) Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford. ISBN 978-1118718162
Philosophy before the Greeks. The Pursuit of Truth in Ancient Babylonia (2015), Princeton University Press. ISBN

References[edit]

Columbia University: Marc Van de Mieroop
Magazine Interview
(http://www.columbia.academia.edu/MarcVanDeMieroop)

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Theater Event System

The United States Theater Event System (TES) is a missile-warning system. The TES is composed of three ground elements: the Space-Based Infrared System (SBIRS) Mission Control Station, the JTAGS, and the Tactical Detection and Reporting system. The TES in-theater capability will be enhanced significantly as its hardware and software are upgraded to interface with the future SBIRS High and Space Tracking and Surveillance System satellite constellations.[1]
See also[edit]

Joint Tactical Ground Station (JTAGS)
Defense Support Program (DSP)
Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS)

References[edit]

^ High Frontier Journal, Vol 4, No. 1: “The Army’s Space Cadre”

This United States military article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Searcy County, Arkansas

Not to be confused with Searcy, Arkansas.

Searcy County, Arkansas

Searcy County Courthouse

Location in the U.S. state of Arkansas

Arkansas’s location in the U.S.

Founded
December 13, 1838

Seat
Marshall

Largest city
Marshall

Area

 • Total
669 sq mi (1,733 km2)

 • Land
666 sq mi (1,725 km2)

 • Water
2.4 sq mi (6 km2), 0.4%

Population (est.)

 • (2015)
7,869

 • Density
12/sq mi (5/km²)

Congressional districts
1st, 3rd

Time zone
Central: UTC-6/-5

Searcy County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. As of the 2010 census, the population was 8,195.[1] The county seat is Marshall.[2] The county was formed December 13, 1838, from a portion of Marion County and named for Richard Searcy, the first clerk and judge in the Arkansas Territory. The city of Searcy, Arkansas, some seventy miles away, shares the name despite having never been part of Searcy County. The county is an alcohol prohibition or dry county.

Contents

1 History
2 Geography

2.1 Major highways
2.2 Adjacent counties
2.3 National protected areas

3 Demographics
4 Government and politics
5 Education
6 Communities

6.1 Cities
6.2 Towns
6.3 Townships

7 See also
8 References
9 External links

History[edit]
During the American Civil War, Searcy County, Arkansas had strong, pro-Union leanings, forming an organization, known as the “Arkansas Peace Society”.[1]
Geography[edit]
According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 669 square miles (1,730 km2), of which 666 square miles (1,720 km2) is land and 2.4 square miles (6.2 km2) (0.4%) is water.[3]
Major highways[edit]

U.S. Highway 65
Arkansas Highway 14
Arkansas Highway 16
Arkansas Highway 27
Arkansas Highway 66
Arkansas Highway 74
Arkansas Highway 235
Arkansas Highway 333
Arkansas Highway 374
Arkansas Highway 377

Adjacent counties[edit]

Marion County (north)
Baxter County (northeast)
Stone County (east)
Van Buren County (south)
Pope County (southwest)
Newton County (west)
Boone County (northwest)

National protected areas[edit]

Buffalo National River (part)
Ozark National Forest (part)

Demographics[edit]

Historical population

Census
Pop.

1840
936

1850
1,979

111.4%

1860
5,271

166.3%

1870
5,614

6.5%

1880
7,278

29.6%

1890
9,664

32.8%

1900
11,988

24.0%

1910
14,825

23.7%

1920
14,590

−1.6%

1930
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