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Joint Precision Approach and Landing System

LAAS architecture, similar in concept to JPALS LDGPS fixed base category

The Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) is a military, all-weather landing system based on real-time differential correction of the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal, augmented with a local area correction message, and transmitted to the user via secure means. The onboard receiver compares the current GPS-derived position with the local correction signal, deriving a highly accurate three-dimensional position capable of being used for all-weather approaches via an Instrument Landing System-style display. While JPALS is similar to Local Area Augmentation System, but intended primarily for use by the military, some elements of JPALS may eventually see their way into civilian use to help protect high-value civilian operations against unauthorized signal alteration.

Contents

1 History
2 Operation
3 Accuracy
4 Benefits
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

History[edit]

JPALS tactical prototype

The development of JPALS was a result of two main military requirements. First, the military needs an all-service, highly mobile all-weather precision approach system, tailorable to a wide range of environments, from shipboard use to rapid installation at makeshift airfields. Second, they need a robust system that can maintain a high level of reliability in combat operations, particularly in its ability to effectively resist jamming.
Operation[edit]
JPALS encompasses two main categories: SRGPS (Shipboard Relative GPS) and LDGPS (Land/Local Differential GPS). SRGPS provides highly accurate approach positioning for operations aboard ship, including aircraft carriers, helo and STO/VL carriers, and other shipboard operations, primarily helicopter operations.
LDGPS is further divided into three sub-categories: Fixed Base, Tactical, and Special Missions. Fixed Base is used for ongoing operations at military airfields around the world, while the Tactical system is portable, designed for relatively short-term, austere airfield operations. The Special Missions system is a highly portable system capable of rapid installation and use by Special Forces.
Accuracy[edit]
The accuracy of Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is better than CAT III ILS accuracy, and will provide horizontal and vertical resolutions of less than 1 m. Although the exact accuracy of JPALS will remain classified, it’s estimated that JPALS will meet or exceed this accuracy for authorized users.
B
소라넷

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Lublin railway station

Lublin Station

B

Location
Za Cukrownią, Lublin, Lublin Voivodeship
Poland

Owned by
Polskie Koleje Państwowe S.A.

Platforms
6

History

Opened
1877 (renovated 1996-2004)

Previous names
Lublin Główny

Railway lines in the area around Lublin. Lines marked in red and blue do not carry passenger traffic.

Lublin railway station (Polish Stacja Lublin) is the most important railway station in Lublin, Poland. It is sometimes referred to as Lublin Główny (Lublin Main), to distinguish it from two other (much smaller) stations located in Lublin. The main station building was opened in 1877, together with the Vistula River Railroad, which connected Warsaw with Kovel. At the time Lublin was in the Russian Empire as part of Congress Poland.
The station serves trains running on the three significant passenger carrying lines radiating from Lublin: the line to Warsaw, the line to Chełm and the border with Ukraine, and the line to Przeworsk. It is one of the busiest stations in eastern Poland, with over 50 train departures on a typical day.
Following the recreation of Poland in 1918, the station building was reconstructed in the 1920s to give it a more Polish style,[1] as the original building looked like a typical station of the Russian Empire.[2] In recent years the station was completely refurbished. Because of this, it is now considered one of the best railway stations in Poland, according to Gazeta Wyborcza which gave it second place in the ranking of 23 most significant Polish railway stations.[3]
The station is linked by rail to the Lublin Airport.
In 2011 a modernisation of the line north of Lublin to Lubartów started. The 25 km single track section had its maximum speed upgraded to 120 km/h, from previous 30-60 km/h.[4] Once finished, passenger services were restored on it starting from April 2, 2013. [5]
References[edit]

^ Photo of station in the 1940s
^ Photo of the station as built
^ Gazeta Wyborcza 2008 ranking
^ Remont torów na odcinku Lublin Lubartów: Pojedziemy 120 km/h
^ Lubelskie: Modernizacja linii nr 30 będzie kontynuowana

External links[edit]

Media related to Main Train Station in Lublin at Wikimedia Commons

Coordinates: 51°13′54″N 22°34′07″E / 51.2316°N 22.5686°E / 51.2316; 22.5686

부천오피

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1978 European Athletics Championships – Women’s pentathlon

Events at the
1978 European
Athletics Championships

Track events

100 m
 
men
 
women

200 m

men

women

400 m

men

women

800 m

men

women

1500 m

men

women

3000 m

women

5000 m

men

10,000 m

men

100 m hurdles

women

110 m hurdles

men

400 m hurdles

men

women

3000 m
steeplechase

men

4×100 m relay

men

women

4×400 m relay

men

women

Road events

Marathon

men

20 km walk

men

50 km walk

men

Field events

High jump

men

women

Pole vault

men

Long jump

men

women

Triple jump

men

Shot put

men

women

Discus throw

men

women

Hammer throw

men

Javelin throw

men

women

Combined events

Pentathlon

women

Decathlon

men

This box:

view
talk
edit

The women’s pentathlon at the 1978 European Athletics Championships was held in Praha, then Czechoslovakia, at Stadion Evžena Rošického on 1 and 2 September 1978.[1]

Contents

1 Medalists
2 Results

2.1 Final

3 Participation
4 References

Medalists[edit]

Gold
Margit Papp
 Hungary

Silver
Burglinde Pollak
 East Germany

Bronze
Kristine Nitzsche
 East Germany

Results[edit]
Final[edit]
1/2 September
  The highest mark recorded in each event is highlighted in yellow

Rank
Name
Nationality
100m H
SP
HJ
LJ
800m
Points
Notes

01 !
Margit Papp
 Hungary
13.70
(w: 0.5 m/s)
15.41
1.81
6.22
(w: -0.9 m/s)
2:16.2
4694 (4655)

02 !
Burglinde Pollak
 East Germany
13.48
(w: 0.5 m/s)
16.64
1.65
6.17
(w: 0.4 m/s)
2:15.0
4614 (4600)

03 !
Kristine Nitzsche
 East Germany
14.02
(w: -0.4 m/s)
12.77
1.93
6.13
(w: 0.8 m/s)
2:12.7
4648 (4599)

4
Beatrix Philipp
 West Germany
14.65
(w: -0.4 m/s)
17.95
1.77
6.03
(w: -1.2 m/s)
2:19.2
4582 (4554)

5
Yekaterina Smirnova
 Soviet Union
13.43
(w: 0.5 m/s)
14.10
1.79
6.13
(w: -0.7 m/s)
2:19.7
4545 (4534)

6
Ramona Neubert
 East Germany
14.14
(w: 0.5 m/s)
13.29
1.75
6.33
(w: -1.2 m/s)
2:21.3
4381 (4380)

7
Ina Losch
 West Germany
15.03
(w: 0.5 m/s)
12.14
1.79
6.23
(w: -2.0 m/s)
2:13.97
4302 (4319)

8
Florence Picaut
 France
13.98
(w: 0.5 m/s)
13.16
1.83
5.80
(w: 0.4 m/s)
2:25.0
4281 (4307)

9
Marcela Koblasová
 Czechoslovakia
14.35
(w: -0.4 m/s)
13.38
1.71
6.00
(w: -0.6 m/s)
2:24.6
4161 (4210)

10
Cornelia Sulek
 West Germany
14.66
(w: -0.3 m/s)
14.78
1.79
5.44
(w: 0.4 m/s)
2:24.7
연예인야동

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Chyavana (disambiguation)

Chyavana Kalyanaka (Sanskrit: च्यवन कल्याणक): When soul of a Tirthankara comes into his mother’s womb.

Chyavana Rishi (Hinduism)

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Chyavana.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

수원오피

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Visa policy of Armenia

Armenian entry stamp from the Bagratashen-Sadakhlo land border crossing with Georgia

Armenia allows citizens of specific countries and territories to visit Armenia for tourism or business purposes without having to obtain a visa or allows them to obtain a visa on arrival or online. For some countries the visa requirement waiver is practiced on ad hoc basis, and is not formalized by a bilateral agreement.

Contents

1 Visa policy map
2 Visa-waiver countries
3 Visa on arrival
4 E-visa
5 See also
6 References
7 External links

Visa policy map[edit]

Visa policy of Armenia

Visa-waiver countries[edit]
Holders of all types of passports from the following 53 countries are not required to obtain a visa for entry to Armenia for a stay of maximum 180 days per year:[1][2]

All European Union citizens
 Andorra
 Argentina
 Azerbaijan
 Belarus
 Brazil
 Georgia
 Iceland
 Iran (90 days)
 Kazakhstan
 Kyrgyzstan
 Liechtenstein
 Macau (90 days)

 Moldova
 Monaco
 Montenegro
 Norway
 Russia
 San Marino
  Switzerland
 Tajikistan
 Ukraine
 United States
 Uruguay
 Uzbekistan
  Vatican City

In addition, a visa is not required for holders of passports for public affairs issued by  China.
The amendment in the form of the diplomatic note on modification of the current agreement on visa-free travel between Russia and Armenia is under preparation. After it enters into force, citizens of Russia will be able to travel to Armenia using only the internal passport of the citizen of Russia.[3]
Armenia plans to sign a visa-free agreement with  Serbia. [4]
Holders of diplomatic or official/service passports of China, Egypt, Iran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Mexico, Philippines, Serbia, Singapore, Syria, South Korea, Turkmenistan, Vietnam and holders of diplomatic passports of India and the United Arab Emirates do not require a visa to visit Armenia.
Visa on arrival[edit]
Visitors traveling as tourists (except from the countries listed below) can obtain a visa on arrival for a maximum stay of 120 days at a cost of AMD 15,000. They may also apply for an e-visa in advance.[5][6]
Visa on arrival can be granted at following immigration checkpoints:

International airports and railway station:

Zvartnots International Airport (Yerevan)
Shirak Airport (Gyumri)
Ayrum railway station (border with Georgia)

Land checkpoints:

Bagratashen (b
인천오피

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Raseborg

Raseborg
Raseborg – Raasepori

Town

Raseborgs stad
Raaseporin kaupunki

Castle of Raseborg

Coat of arms

Location of Raseborg in Finland

Coordinates: 59°58.5′N 023°26′E / 59.9750°N 23.433°E / 59.9750; 23.433Coordinates: 59°58.5′N 023°26′E / 59.9750°N 23.433°E / 59.9750; 23.433

Country
Finland

Region
Uusimaa

Sub-region
Raseborg sub-region

Charter
2009

Government

 • Town manager
Tom Simola

Area (2011-01-01)[1]

 • Total
2,354.17 km2 (908.95 sq mi)

 • Land
1,147.70 km2 (443.13 sq mi)

 • Water
1,206.47 km2 (465.82 sq mi)

Area rank
30th largest in Finland

Population (2016-03-31)[2]

 • Total
28,347

 • Rank
36th largest in Finland

 • Density
24.7/km2 (64/sq mi)

Population by native language[3]

 • Swedish
7,001,662,000,000,000,000♠66.2% (official)

 • Finnish
7,001,310,000,000,000,000♠31% (official)

 • Others
7,000,280,000,000,099,999♠2.8%

Population by age[4]

 • 0 to 14
7,001,163,000,000,000,000♠16.3%

 • 15 to 64
7,001,635,000,000,000,000♠63.5%

 • 65 or older
7,001,202,000,000,000,000♠20.2%

Time zone
EET (UTC+2)

 • Summer (DST)
EEST (UTC+3)

Municipal tax rate[5]
21%

Climate
Dfb

Website
www.raseborg.fi

Raseborg (Finnish: Raasepori) is a town (administrative area in Finland) and municipality of Finland. It was created on January 1, 2009, when the municipalities of Ekenäs, Karis and Pohja were consolidated into a single town.[6]
The town has a population of 28,347 (31 March 2016)[2] and covers an area of 2,354.17 square kilometres (908.95 sq mi) of which 1,206.47 km2 (465.82 sq mi) is water.[1] The population density is 24.7 inhabitants per square kilometre (64/sq mi).
The name of the new town is based on the Castle of Raseborg located in Ekenäs, or formerly in the municipality of Snappertuna. Historically the name of the county was also Raseborg in the 14th century.
The town is bilingual, with a majority (66.2%) being Swedish-speakers and a minority (31%) Finnish-speakers.
In February 2011, Raseborg Municipality entered into a “Friendship Co-operation Agreement” with Makana Municipality in South Africa. The project, which is to last three years, seeks to facilitate information sharing in the
분당오피

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Randall K. Filer

Randall Keith Filer (born January 14, 1952) is an American economist. Dr. Filer is a Professor of Economics at Hunter College and the Graduate Center [1] of the City University of New York and a Visiting Professor of Economics and Senior Scholar at CERGE-EI. He is President of the CERGE-EI Foundation,[2] a US-based nonprofit that supports economic education in the post-communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Professor Filer serves as the Eastern European Coordinator of the Global Development Network (GDN),[3] and is a member (past Chair) of the International Faculty Committee at the International School of Economics in Tbilisi (ISET) in Tbilisi, Georgia.[4] He is a research Fellow of the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in Bonn,[5] CESifo (Munich),[6] the William Davidson Institute (Ann Arbor) [7] and the Manhattan Institute (NYC).
Professor Filer received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1979 where he was affiliated with the Industrial Relations Section and the Office of Population Research. He graduated magna cum laude with Highest Honors in economics from Haverford College. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the ACE program of the European Union, the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, the Volkswagen Foundation, and the National Endowment for the Arts, among others and has appeared in leading professional journals including The American Economic Review, The Journal of Political Economy, The Review of Economics and Statistics, The European Economic Review, The Journal of Development Economics, Economic Development and Cultural Change, and The Economics of Transition. His areas of expertise include financial and capital markets, labor markets, urban economics, demography and development economics, including the economic transition in the post-communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe. Professor Filer has twice been a Fulbright Scholar in the Czech Republic as well as a visiting scholar at the Institute of Economics, Zagreb, Croatia.
Professor Filer is a member of Prague Society for International Cooperation, an NGO whose main goals are networking and the development of a new generation of responsible, well-informed leaders and thinkers.[8]
References[edit]

^ CUNY Graduate Center Faculty listing
^ CERGE-EI Foundation Board
^ GDN Research Details
^ ISET Faculty page
^ IZA Fellow page
^ CESifo Fellow
^ William Davidson Institute Fellows listing
^ Members of Prague Society

External links[edit]

Biogr
부산오피

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Havir, Khuzestan

Havir
حوير

village

Havir

Coordinates: 31°21′16″N 49°20′05″E / 31.35444°N 49.33472°E / 31.35444; 49.33472Coordinates: 31°21′16″N 49°20′05″E / 31.35444°N 49.33472°E / 31.35444; 49.33472

Country
 Iran

Province
Khuzestan

County
Ramhormoz

Bakhsh
Central

Rural District
Howmeh-ye Gharbi

Population (2006)

 • Total
204

Time zone
IRST (UTC+3:30)

 • Summer (DST)
IRDT (UTC+4:30)

Havir (Persian: حوير‎‎, also Romanized as Ḩavīr and Ḩoveyr; also known as Havair and Huvīr)[1] is a village in Howmeh-ye Gharbi Rural District, in the Central District of Ramhormoz County, Khuzestan Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 204, in 37 families.[2]
References[edit]

^ Havir can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering “-3066261” in the “Unique Feature Id” form, and clicking on “Search Database”.
^ “Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)”. Islamic Republic of Iran. Archived from the original (Excel) on 2011-11-11. 

v
t
e

Ramhormoz County

Capital

Ramhormoz

Districts

Central

Cities

Ramhormoz

Rural Districts
and villages

Abolfares

Abezhdan
Abezhdan-e Sofla
Bavaj
Darreh Khoshk
Darreh Ney
Darreh Tu Nem Nemi
Do Gacheh
Hajjiabad
Kabutari
Kal Ahmadi
Kungerdeh
Nuran
Pay Risheh Kuh
Sar Tang
Savareh
Seh Tolun
Shahrak-e Shahid Rajai
Shomilan
Tang Talkh-e Do
Tang Talkh-e Shomilan
Tang Talkh-e Yek
Zir Rah

Howmeh-ye Gharbi
(West Howmeh)

Arayyez-e Ahmadi
Bayman-e Ariyez
Beseytin
Boneh-ye Cheragh
Boneh-ye Fakhr-e Bala
Boneh-ye Fakhr-e Pain
Boneh-ye Karim
Boneh-ye Naimeh
Boneh-ye Sahrab
Boneh-ye Sukhteh
Boni
Chamum-e Bughar
Chamum-e Khar Maarak
Cheshmeh Badir
Darvishan
Diduni
Dimeh-ye Ban Said
Dimeh-ye Karim
Dimeh-ye Shakraleh
Eyn Korreh
Eyn-e Haddad
Eyn-e Hammad
Gavdari-ye Hormozi
Gharganeh
Ghazaleh-ye Do
Ghoveyleh-ye Naqed
Ghoveyleh-ye Sadat
Hajj Mariyeh
Hanushi
Havir
Kamtuleh-ye Shahriari
Kamtuleh-ye Yusefabad
Kimeh
Kut-e Sheykh
Marbachcheh
Matui
Molla Abdollah
Morad Beygi
Moradbeygi-ye Khalaf
Omm ol Emamid
Qaleh-ye Kohneh
Qaleh-ye Molla Bandar
Rahdar-e Olya
Rahdar-e Sofla
Sandali-ye Gav Mishi
Sandali-ye Kanan
Sar Cheshmeh-ye Olya
Sar Cheshmeh-ye Sofla
Sar Tali
Saray-ye Sheykh Ali
Savadeh
Tall Barmi
Tall Gesar
Tall-e Zarrini
Toghli Alabad
Toghli Albu Fatileh
Toghli Sadat
Zahiri
Zaraqoli-ye Bala
Zaraqoli-ye Pain
Zobeydeh-
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